AAS

Our inaugural meeting was on the 8th November 2010 and we officially formed in February 2011.
AAS holds monthly meetings, often with guest speakers.

All guests are welcome!
No knowledge necessary, just a curious mind.

We are able to provide assistance with setting up your telescope or just helping to find your way around the night sky.

AAS is able to host discussions on subjects as varied as Dark Energy through to 'How dark is your sky'.

Come along and get a new perspective on the universe in which you live!

Categories

Stats

Visits today: _
Total Visits: _
Page Views Today: _

Your IP: 54.82.99.169

Reminder-Next Meeting Monday 25th March

A quick reminder that the next meeting is tomorrow evening.
The meeting is our AGM and is at 7:30pm in the Kings Head.  Documents are on the Downloads web page HERE

Don’t forget – Saturday 22nd “Exploring the Universe” in Brynmawr

Our friends in HOVAS (Heads of the Valleys Astro Soc) are holding their event in the Tabor Centre in Brymawr from 12pm to 5pm, there is also a talk in evening at 6pm by Martin Griffiths on extra terrestrial life.  For more details please check the poster on Abergavenny AS website. 

Martin Goff from MSG meteorites will also be there selling a comprehensive range of rocks from space.  Martin has a lot of expertise and enthusiasm – so if you are looking to start a collection, add to your collection at competitive prices or just handle some incredibly old objects now is your chance.

For information the Heads of the valleys road A465 through Clydach will be closed this weekend.

Next Meeting : Monday 25th March

Our next meeting is the Annual General Meeting of the Society.

If you want to hear about the events of the last year, have any suggestions as to how the AAS can develop and prosper or wish to volunteer then please do come along on the 25th.

We are a bunch of amateurs with varying levels of understanding that wish to share our fascination with the comos, so come along and join with us.  As it says on the web-site home page : No knowledge necessary, just a curious mind.

The draft minutes of last year’s meeting can be read at AGM 2018 minutes 

Usual time and place; The King’s Head, Abergavenny, at 7:30pm

Next Meeting – Monday 11th March

Next Monday Professor Jane Greaves, Astronomy Group, Cardiff School of Physics and Astronomy, will present her work on nano-diamonds.  As well as having published over 170 peer reviewed papers she received the IoP Fred Hoyle medal in 2017 for her contribution to astrophysics.

Prof Jane Greaves, Cardiff School of Physics & Astronomy

 

Her topic is “Spinning Space Diamonds”.
“I will talk about the sparkling trail of diamonds from exploding stars to the birth of the solar system. My team recently found diamonds orbiting a few very young luminous stars, and I will discuss how this chance discovery came about and how it helped to solve a problem of mystery radio waves that has existed for over 20 years”.

 

 

 
The usual time and place: 7:30pm at the Kings Head, Abergavenny.

Come along to be entertained and informed.  All are welcome.

Event-23rd March 2019

Exploring the Universe; a HoVAS event in association with Usk & Abergavenny Societies.
Tabor Centre, Brynmawr. 23rd March 2019, 12:00pm/5:00pm plus evening talk 6:30/7:30 pm.

Next Meeting – Monday 25th February

For our next meeting Jenifer Millard from Cardiff University School of Physics and Astronomy will be talking about GALAXIES.
Jenifer is an amateur astronomer and also co-presents the blog @AwesomeAstroPod.

Jenifer Millard

Usual time and venue, The Kings Head, next to Abergavenny Town Hall, at 7:30pm

Should be an interesting and informative evening.  All are welcome.

How dark are your skies?

The British Astronomical Society has joined with  the  Campaign to Protect Rural England for Star Count 2019. This cosmic census that will help map light pollution across the country.

All you will need to do is to count the number of stars you can see (with the naked eye) within the constellation of Orion. The national Star Count will take place from Saturday 2 February until Saturday 23 February, to give families a chance to take part. 

How to take part:

  • Try to do your count on a night when the sky is clear, with no haze or clouds, then wait until after 7pm so the sky is really dark.
  • Looking south into the night sky, find the Orion constellation, with its four corners –  and ‘three-star belt’. Take a few moments to let your eyes adjust, then simply count the number of stars you can see within the rectangle made by the four corner stars – Betelgeuse, Bellatrix, Rigel and Saiph. You should not count these corners stars, but you can count the three stars in the middle (the belt).
  • Make a note of the number of stars seen with the naked eye (not with telescopes or binoculars) and then simply complete the online survey form on the CPRE website (will be available at the start of the Star Count).
  • Share your experiences with others on social media using #starcount2019 @CPRE @BritAstro
  • Check back to see the national results and see how your area compares to the rest of the country.

The constellation of Orion showing the Star Count area. Count stars within the area marked, but not the corner stars.

Image by Paul Brierley

Next Meeting Monday 11th February

A question was asked at our January discussion group about the evolution of the Solar System and planetary migration.  So, at this meeting we can explore the issue in a bit more depth.  I am hoping I will be able to show a short video, or videos, illustrating the Grand Tack Hypothesis.

If we have some time left over there are other topics that have piqued my interest in the last month that we can look at.

All are welcome and all input is appreciated.

Suggested Topics:-
1          Formation of the Solar System  –  planetary migration
2          Did a collision trigger life on earth
3          Mining the Moon
4          Black Hole spinning as fast as it theoretically can.
5          Dark Matter: The milky way halo & another low DM galaxy discovered.
6          The Hubble Constant confusion: using quasars to estimate it’s value.

If there are any topics that anyone wishes to talk about do bring them along or let me know by email or at a meeting.  

Usual time and place: 7:30pm in the upper room at the King’s Head, Abergavenny

Next Meeting 28th January

Keith Mosely FRAS, from Monmouth Astronomical Research Society, is coming to talk to us about the BepiColombo joint European/Japanese mission to investigate the planet Mercury.
Usual time and place, 7:30pm in an upper room at the Kings Head, next to Abergavenny Town Hall.
All are most welcome

ESA-JAXA BepiColombo probe to Mercury

BepiColombo is a joint mission of the European Space Agency (ESA) and the Japan Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) to the planet Mercury.  The mission comprises two satellites launched together: the Mercury Planetary Orbiter (MPO) and Mio (Mercury Magnetospheric OrbiterMMO).  The mission will perform a comprehensive study of Mercury, including characterization of its magnetic field, magnetosphere, and both interior and surface structure. It was launched on an Ariane 5 rocket on 20 October 2018 at 01:45 UTC, with an arrival at Mercury planned for December 2025, after a flyby of Earth, two flybys of Venus, and six flybys of Mercury. Wikipedia

The adventures of Curiosity rover in Gale crater: exploring the geology of Mars

For information there is a lecture on the geology of Mars at Swansea University on Saturday 15th December 2018, it will be given by Professor Sangeev Gupta from Imperial College, London.  The event is hosted by the South Wales Geological Association (SWGA).  The meeting will begin at 11:00 am with refreshments being served from 10:15 am.  The Lecture will be in the Department of Geography in the Wallace building.  The refreshments will be on the landing area on the first floor, just upstairs from the main entrance.

Admission is free and there is no need to book, just turn up.