Next meeting by Zoom Thursday 25th 7:30pm

Join Zoom Meeting
https://us02web.zoom.us/j/89046641103?pwd=NjZuQlFPQjBoVWhtODJUNVJYRWlXUT09

Meeting ID: 890 4664 1103
Passcode: 689201

The next meeting of the Astronomy Society will be this Thursday the 25th November; Bob Wright will give a talk on exploring Venus.  The meeting will be by Zoom only and the links for joining can be found above. The meeting will start at 7:30 pm, all welcome.

Astro Photos

Following my email earlier this week I have had some photos sent to me.
I have included one from Tony P-F on the home page slide show and another of his, M42 the Orion nebula, has been loaded up on the Gallery/Deepsky photo page LINK

Any other photos for inclusion I am more than happy to receive. It would be nice to rotate members photos on the home page, a maximum of 4 photos can be used at any one time. Just email them to me.

Observing group

An observing group is being formed that any members can join. The idea is that you register your details with a WhatsApp group (the Astronomy Observing Group) and from time to time when members are going out to observe and they want some company a notfication will pop up on your smart phone. Obviously you will need a WhatsApp account but that it is. It is open to anyone whatever your experience or equipment – even just a pair of eyes and an interest. You can leave the group anytime to stop the notifications. The issue it addresses is that some members would like to do some observing but may lack experience or just want some company, also to book events more than a day or so in advance given the weather in South Wales is asking for problems.

To join the group simply send your details to Andrew Lohfink, the coordinator. You can do this by texting Andrew on his mobile phone number which is 07506448815. In the message please include your full name, the society you are a member of (if any) and a request to join the observing group, Andrew will then add you to the list. Andrew is the custodian of this data and it will not be used for any other purpose.

Website Update

I have changed the theme and may continue to “tinker” with it for a while. So, please excuse me doing so on a live page. Any comments – good/bad/indifferent are welcome.
It is providing difficult (for me anyway!) to get the page menu displaying on the web page so I have used another theme to achieve that.
I’m not overly keen on this set up but it will do as a temporary option for the moment. What do you think?

A notice from Simon at Bath Astronomers.

Register free on Eventbrite.

The Caroline Herschel Prize Lecture 2021 has been awarded to Dr Jenny Carter, University of Leicester, and you are invited to the online, free to attend event this coming month. It is entitled “Earth versus Sun: a precarious relationship in space” and is being held on Zoom at 7pm on Thursday 18th November.

You need to register for the free event via Eventbrite beforehand using the link https://tinyurl.com/2tjzdz3m. Details of the Zoom meeting will be sent to you in due course.

https://apps.talktalk.co.uk/appsuite/api/mail/image002.jpg?action=attachment&folder=default0%2FINBOX&id=36226&attachment=1.3&user=3&context=1732991&decrypt=&sequence=1&delivery=view

The talk:

The intimate, yet turbulent relationship between the Sun and Earth dominates space around our planet. We are familiar with one consequence of this interaction, through the spectacular displays of aurora, and other effects include currents induced in long distance cables, or the loss of signals and damage to spacecraft. Collectively, we term these effects `’space weather’. Understanding this space weather is paramount for our technology-dependent society.

In this talk, we will explore how our Earth is protected from the Sun’s solar wind by its magnetic field. We will follow how the Earth’s magnetic field gets buffered and altered, as the solar blows stronger, weaker, or changes direction. We will see how the SMILE spacecraft will soon revolutionise our view of near-Earth space by taking the first images of the solar-terrestrial interaction. Space near Earth is highly dynamic and volatile, and this drama is played right above our heads.

The Caroline Herschel Prize Lectureship is awarded annually and previous recipients include Dr Becky Smethurst, Dr Anna Lisa Varri, and Dr Sarah Rugheimer. It is awarded by the Herschel Society, in association with the Royal Astronomical Society, to celebrate Caroline’s memory by supporting promising women astronomers early in their careers.

AAS Website update : 20th Oct

Hi everyone. 
The website should be back up now.  There are still some adjustments need to be made, eg the “Page Tabs” are not showing.  However, the Home page is now accessible and the links in the emails should also be working.
Hopefully the other issues will be sorted out and full functionality will be resumed (fingers crossed!).
Any problems you become aware of just drop me a line.  Equally, if anyone has suggestions on how the web site could be improved please just let me know and I will investigate.  I am particularly interested in how it displays on smart phone screens as many people now use these for internet access.

Apologies for the downtime but I think I am getting there, albeit slowly.

Kevin